On moveable feasts…. and dancing with ambiguity

Easter is a moveable feast – meaning that it occurs on a different day each year unlike many other religious feast days that occur on a fixed day every year.

The very idea of a moveable feast on a weekend full of spring conjures the possibility of moving your feast to wherever it will be most enjoyed, be it ‘al fresco’, on a formally decorated table or on your knees in front of the TV the point is to eat something a bit special. Easter has many feasting choices – its not all about chocolate (really???!) – and there are many tasty ways to celebrate the hope and fertility of spring.

My mum’s lemon meringue pie would certainly be on my menu for a springtime feast, indoors or out, come rain or shine. I have nothing but deeply appreciative memories about this fabulous pie as the very special treat after dinner on Easter Sunday – an absolutely scrumptious experience of creamy, lemony zestiness, rich short crust pastry all topped with ‘just right crunchy-chewy ‘ clouds of meringue heaven… my mum always got this just right!

Oddly, embracing correctness – wanting everything to be done the ‘right way’ or perfectly is not helpful in certain stages of the creative process.

Some even say that this kind of fixed mindset at the wrong time provides little room for creative thinking and imagination. Whilst there are times when nothing else will do other than the ‘right way’, as in the production of mum’s lemon meringue pie, or when administering a medical procedure safely, there are many times when the alternative and more creative mindset is one where ambiguity can be embraced in order to find something new and of value.

‘Embracing ambiguity’ means being able to accept two or more seemingly contradictory or odd ideas as being equally valid or able to co-exist.

If you are an explorer of the creative mindset it’s an interesting thing to notice about yourself - where and when you are good at embracing ambiguity and where it deserts you and ‘correctness’ gets the upper hand.

Here’s a small test – can you embrace the ambiguity of when Easter falls in 2018 – see below?  Try scoring yourself on a scale of 0-10 where 10 is ‘yes, I’m completely comfortable with this idea’ and 0 is ‘no, it just cannot be!’

It returns us to the notion of moveable feasts and the changing dates of Easter – did you know that Easter in 2018 is set to happen on April 1st or April Fool’s Day (ref Church of England web-site)?

How did you do?  I scored quite low on the embracing ambiguity test (for me) 5/10 - try it guys!

Happy ambiguities!

Jude Sweeting, Director of Quality & Enjoyment